Saturday, January 7, 2012

WHO Confirms Bird Flu Cases In Egypt, China..but not a word About the Senator who died of Bird Flu in Zimbabwe

Avian influenza - situation in Egypt - update 60

The Ministry of Health and Population of Egypt has notified WHO of a case of human infection with avian influenza A (H5N1) virus.‪

The case is a 42 year-old male from Menofia Governorate. He developed symptoms on 16 December 2011 and was admitted to hospital on 21 December 2011, where he received oseltamivir treatment. He was in critical condition and died on 22 December 2011.

The case was confirmed by the Central Public Health Laboratories, a National Influenza Centre of the WHO Global Influenza Surveillance Network, on 24 December 2011.

Investigations into the source of infection indicated that the case had exposure to sick and dead backyard poultry.

Of the 157 cases confirmed to date in Egypt, 55 have been fatal. Source

CHINA

5 JANUARY 2012 - The Ministry of Health of China has notified WHO of a human case of avian influenza A (H5N1) virus infection.‪

The case is a 39-year-old male from Shenzhen, Guangdong Province. He developed symptoms on 21 December 2011 and was admitted to hospital on 25 December 2011. He was in critical condition and died on 31 December 2011. The case was laboratory diagnosed by Guangdong CDC on 30 December 2011 and confirmed by China CDC on 31 December 2011. Investigation into the source of infection is ongoing. Close contacts of the case are being monitored and to date all remain well.

Of the 41 cases confirmed to date in China, 27 have been fatal. Source

Article 30th Dec 2011 - Research on the H5N1 influenza (bird flu) virus' human transmissibility is seriously starting to worry WHO (World Health Organization) experts - in a written statement, the authors express concern about the potential risks linked to this research. The possible negative consequences of some experiments are serious and potentially dangerous. However, WHO adds that in cases where scientists work under the strictest of conditions, experiments should continue so that the fight against bird flu may progress.

The H5N1 flu virus does not infect humans easily or often. However, it currently kills 60% of those it does infect. Read More