Friday, April 22, 2011

CIA tried to frame Bulgaria for shooting of Pope John Paul II to discredit Communism, new book claims - 22nd Apr 2011

The CIA tried to frame Bulgaria for the attempted assassination of Pope John Paul II in 1981 to discredit Communism, a new book has claimed.

The U.S. intelligence agency orchestrated the story that the eastern European country's regime was behind the shooting, two journalists suggest.

Their new book says the attempted killing was in fact masterminded by an extreme-right wing Turkish group called the Grey Wolves purely because of their anti-western ideology.

Pope John Paul II was shot four times by a sniper in St Peter's Square, Vatican City on May 13, 1981. Mehmet Ali Agca, 23, was arrested and jailed following the failed assassination attempt.

The Pope's life was saved after he underwent five hours of surgery. The gunman, using a 9mm weapon, had hit him twice in the stomach, in the arm and in his little finger.

But the new book - Kill The Pope: The Truth about the Assassination Attempt on John Paul II - claims Agca, a Turk, had no links to the Soviet cause. Read More